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16

Jul

kelsium:

You can tell a girl she’s smart her whole life, encourage her in school, buy her a chemistry set, send her to math camp, help her apply for college scholarships in STEM fields, and she’s still eventually going to walk into a classroom, a lab, or a job interview and have some man dismiss her existence, deny her funding, pass her over for a promotion, or take credit for her work. How about you work on getting those assholes out of power and quit telling me not to call girls pretty.

08

Jul

Act my age?
What the fuck is that, “act my age”?
What do I care how old I am?
The Ocean is old as fuck.
It will still drown your ass with vigor.

04

Jul

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

25

Jun

5 Problems with ‘Keep Abortion Rare’

holisticsexualhealth:

“Keep Abortion Rare” is a pretty common phrase in the political and cultural conversation around abortion.

And it isn’t just coming from anti-choice folks – more often, it’s actually coming from the pro-choice side.

Declared proudly by former President Clinton and repeated by “pro-choice” politicians over the last decade, the phrase often accompanies a plea to keep abortion legal.

You’ll see it on signs and banners at an abortion rally,  with the phrase: “Keep Abortion Safe, Legal, and Rare.” 

This sentiment is often championed and portrayed as “something we can all agree on.” But is it really a desire we have, let alone one that we should be making heard?

Is it even right?  How does this kind of logic affect the abortion movement and all those who seek abortions?

1. We Can’t ‘Keep Abortion Rare’ Because It Isn’t

Abortion isn’t rare.

1-in-3 women in the United States will have had an abortion by the time she is 45.

This is an experience that a lot of people have had, and it’s far more common than many of us are willing to admit. Thanks to that big awful bubble of stigma, many of us just keep our stories locked up and hidden away in shame.

One of the worst lies we can tell about abortion is that no one is having them.

This only serves to make those who have had, or are considering, an abortion feel that much more alienated and alone. So let’s be honest about it.

Read more about how dominant narratives around abortion are based in shame, stigma, and silence in my article here.

Read More

22

Jun

(Source: adriofthedead)

15

Jun

Peter Joseph on structural violence, from this video.

01

Jun

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Typography, Art and Posters You May Have Missed
Art posted during Gay Pride Weekend, Portland, Maine in late(r)-2000s
(Source: Down Is Not Up)

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Typography, Art and Posters You May Have Missed

Art posted during Gay Pride Weekend, Portland, Maine in late(r)-2000s

(Source: Down Is Not Up)

25

May

lazy-flower:

Message for the day

24

May

We need to talk about systemic male violence not the "work of a madman"

thentheysaidburnher:

6 women have been murdered* and 7 more injured in Santa Barbara in a drive by shooting late Friday night which is currently being attributed to a man called Elliot Rodger.** Rodger got into his car…

Madman? Gunman?

MAN

(Source: yoursocialconstructsareshowing)

18

May

The fact that you wish to be treated like a woman shows how much male privilege you’ve enjoyed and how you’ve romanticized or fetishized womanhood. You want to be catcalled, ignored, disrespected, raped, ridiculed and de-humanized. You want to be treated like property? You want to be afraid of saying no to any male who wants something from you? You want to be victim-blamed and told you wanted it and how you deserved it. You want to be forced to wear painful high-heals and stupid dresses and told you can’t do whatever you want to because you don’t have piece of meat dangling between your legs. You want to have lower pay for equal work. You want all your spaces invaded and you want everything about you erased, you want to even be deprived of the ability to speak about your body and its functions without some gender-fucked idiot claiming ‘cissexism’. You want death threats and rape threats on weekly basis. That is what womanhood is. You are more than welcome to it. But until you suffered through all of that, you shut your fucking mouth about ‘feeling’ like a woman.
realmofvikings (via witch-hag)

(Source: realmofvikings)

17

May

What If We Admitted to Children That Sex Is About Pleasure?

One mother makes up for the gaps in sex education.

16

May

For you to insult me, I must first value your opinion.
(via soulfire)

(Source: iamcharliesangel)

Her Mom Wanted Her To Wear A Dress To Prom. Here's What She Wanted To Say But Couldn't.

Two girls use their bodies to tell one really amazing story.

50s-dad:

if you call yourself fiscally conservative and socially liberal what you’re essentially saying is that you like equality in concept but you openly embrace systems that hinder or negate equality because you’re a greedy little shit and you fell for the capitalist propaganda mantra of “anyone can be rich! you can be rich!” hook line and sinker. You are an ideological vacuum, an abyss of cognitive dissonance and only a basic grasp of empathy. We would do better without you.

(Source: necrotelecomnicon)

15

May

[In American education] all we learn of Marx is the perversions of Stalin and Mao; all we learn of anarchism is broken windows and firebombs; all we learn of libertarianism is Ron Paul; all we learn of the labor revolts that shaped 20th century economics is the AFL-CIO; all we learn of the Civil Rights struggle is MLK, while we learn nothing at all about his socialist leanings. Meanwhile we learn almost nothing of feminism, only that the suffragettes won us the right to vote. Few theorists or activists are ever mentioned by name aside from Susan B. Anthony, and she is almost never actually mentioned as being feminist, never mind one of the most important leaders of the movement… History really is written by the victors.